Performing arts grants 2019

Soundfly partners with leading edge music education sites and services to bring you unique tips, tools, and stories to empower and inspire our community to find their sound.

Found Sound Nation leverages mobile technology to create opportunities for youth and underrepresented communities to record and produce high quality music worldwide. Found Sound Nation utilizes a grassroots partnership model with local organizations and has developed work with artists and communities in Senegal, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.

Learn about some of our favorite grants and fellowships, awarding money, time and space to create new works of music, and get the funding boost you need!

Best hood rappers 2019

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few select testimonials of Soundfly’s Modern Mix Techniques course directly from our students.

Modern equipment is incredibly versatile. Sometimes a Swiss army knife unit can take the place of several other pieces of your gear arsenal. If you have something else that does the job just as well, why bother keeping both?

You might feel like your project is ready to tackle your town’s biggest and hippest venues, but the folks who book talent at those places almost certainly feel otherwise. Venues demand that the acts who frequent their stages bring in lots of people because their business models depend on it. But even if you’re certain you’ll be able to draw huge crowds for your first local shows, you should still look for modest places to play when you’re just starting out.

Hi [band/manager name],

Another reason they check bank statements is for “buy here, pay here” loans. In other words, car loans that don’t necessarily go through a bank (or show up on your credit), large furniture or electronic purchases, etc. During the underwriting process, try to avoid making any big purchases or you can make the lender skittish.

Funny 80s rap songs

When saving your projects, make sure that you label them clearly so you can recall their specificities. You can also use folders to organize different projects and versions of songs. Here’s an example of how I often label my tracking projects:

Evan Zwisler is a NYC-based musician who is most notably known for his work with The Values as a songwriter and guitarist. He is an active member of the Brooklyn music scene, throwing fundraisers and organizing compilations for Planned Parenthood and the Anti-Violence Project. He started playing music in the underground punk scene of Shanghai with various local bands when he was in high school before going to California for college and finally moving to New York in 2012.

Dewsberry’s project is to finance the audio and video recording of a live concert in which she’ll debut 16 songs her friends have written for her 60th birthday. It’s commemorative and community-oriented, and it plays with the concept of a Sweet 16 — only fast-forwarded to age 60.

We better go back to the source of the loop for some context — Lauren Hill’s “Ex-Factor” — and holy rabbit holes, did they make it their own! First, they took the sample and pitch-shifted it up a whole step from G♭ to A♭ (thought it sounded kind of chipmunk-esque), then they chopped it up and taped it back together out of order. But what really transforms the music of it is what they didn’t take. So we were right that the singers are singing in A♭ major note logic, but they didn’t sample any A♭ major chords — and how can you have a song in A♭ that doesn’t have any A♭ chords? Also, they didn’t sample any of the bass notes that made some of the singer’s triads into different tetrads.

My production challenge this month was an exercise in adaptivity. Instead of going out and finding outdoor sounds to capture and sample, like we did for April’s monthly challenge, we were tasked with the wonderful opportunity to use sounds from a brand new hip-hop adjacent sample pack that launched recently on Splice. [*Skip ahead to hear my final track.]