Donate musical instruments to charity

In order to set up yourself for success, keep your cords, microphones, headphones, and instrument equipment organized in specific, consistent spots so you always know where they are when you need them. And then, after you’re done with them, always return these items to their respective spots. Put guitars in cases or hang them on the wall, coil cables when they’re not in use, and build shelves to store stuff that gets used less frequently. Big plastic storage bins are also a great option for extra cables and assorted items.

One such example is here in “Let’s Go,” where bassist Benjamin Orr does a double chromatic run in the interlude at the end of the chorus and leading into the “She’s laughing inside” verse. It’s a simple, basic riff, starting at the major third, walking up three notes to the fifth, and continuing with another four-note chromatic run up to the octave. It comes at an opportune moment, building up the suspense leading into the last set of verses, in an already high-tempo, high-energy song.

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them. 

Chamber music america grants

Take the next steps in your music career with Soundfly’s curated Hustle series of articles and popular online course offerings on topics like how to book a tour on a shoestring, how to get all the royalties you never knew existed, and how to let your fans fund your next music project! Use code FLYPAPERSENTME for $100 off any course on the site that isn’t free! 

The highly influential course instructors are: Kenta Yonesaka (Unlocking the Truth, Kendrick Lamar, Chance the Rapper), Tim Leitner (Carly Simon, Adam Ezra, Billy Joel), Brian Losch (Maria Schnieder, Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile), and Leon Kelly (Run the Jewels, Kaytranada, Action Bronson).

But that being said, inspiration isn’t always easy to find, and when you get stuck in your journey to find it, sometimes it’s not clear where to turn to hunt for more. Yet one of the most overlooked places to find fresh new ideas is actually right in front of your face, like right now: blogs!

Another extremely common and timeless technique to make your chorus shine is simply cutting the music out completely for half a measure or even an entire measure in some cases. Some of today’s electronic producers also prefer cutting out effects such as reverb and delay, to make that moment of silence even more dramatic, like you’re falling off a tiny cliff. This technique is especially fun to apply in situations where the chorus vocals start with pick-up notes from the previous measure.

Whatever it is, modern hip-hop is dominated by 808s. We use the term loosely, but 808s reference the historic long bass drum sound first made popular by Roland’s TR-808 drum machine. In today’s production world, it’s hard to find a big hip-hop hit without an 808 or sub bass. These trunk-rattling frequencies are a crucial part of the genre.

Loans for musicians

And since we’re here, we may as well bring it back to the Fab Four again. The Beatles‘ “Hey Jude” starts on a minor third interval, once again at 0:00.

The front panel allowed for more customization than any other tape echo on the market. You could control the repeat rate, intensity, and it had separate levels for echo and reverb so users could make their own unique combinations to suit their sound.

MTV helped break punk in the ’80s, ’90s, and continued through the ’00s with so many alt-rock bands that have become classic simply by virtue of their televised videos. Regardless of what the content of MTV has become of late, we still have a lot to be thankful for in the past.

“Thunder”: The “All the Diatonics” Award goes to this song, with all six main diatonics used! Every chorus is a little different lengthwise, so that’s cool, too. The bridge is really an instrumental, but I’m still calling it a bridge because of the new harmonic material.

Surprising! There is absolutely nothing sexy about the way that people perform the Bach chaconne. Alex Ross goes on to detail the ways that composers like Bach combine the groove of repetitive dance forms with the descending bass lines from laments to make a romantic form of sadness.